Is it safe to cycle during the Coronavirus outbreak?

Last updated 25th March 2020.

“Should I stay (in) or should I go (out)?” Music always makes things better right? But in all seriousness, this is a question we’ve been asked by customers and to be honest, have been asking amongst ourselves too. Bike experts we are, health experts we are not! …But we do know what’s been advised (so far) so we thought we’d help you out if you’re feeling a bit unsure.

Is it safe to cycle during the Coronavirus outbreak?

The mental and physical benefits of cycling have been well proven from health studies, so it could be argued that now is the perfect time to go out for a ride! The situation is however currently changing day by day, but the latest lockdown guidance from the UK government does not prohibit cycling. You are encouraged to stay active, albeit riding solo or with the family members you live with in groups of no more than 2. Providing you are not showing any symptoms, people can still be active outside but are encouraged to maintain a safe distance, advised as 2metres away from other people. To help provide guidance on whether you should be riding or not, we’ve tried to cover all bases below.

I’m working from home. Should I still be riding my bike?

Yes. If you’re symptom-free! As it’s quite a big change to some from their usual routine, some can find working from home to be stressful, and you may quickly feel the effects of cabin fever. Breaking up your day with a ride can be an excellent way to get some fresh air, maintain your fitness and improve your mental health, as well as getting in the miles when you might be missing out on your daily commute.

We’ve called it a #hommute here at Ribble!! Your morning commute, except you end up back at home again!

I am at home with my children/family. Should we be riding our bikes?

Yes. As long as you are all fit and well, and not exhibiting any symptoms, again going for a ride is a great way of keeping active, entertained and spending some quality time together as a family away from distractions.

I’m under 70, and in good health. Should I be riding a bike?

Absolutely! We would recommend taking the precautions outlined below to ensure your safety and that of those around you.

I’m over 70, and in good health. Should I still be riding my bike?

Yes. Riding indoors on a turbo trainer or exercise bike would be recommended to adhere to government guidelines.

I am currently unwell (possibly with a cough or fever). Should I still be riding my bike?

No. In-line with government guidance, those displaying symptoms such as a cough or temperature should be self-isolating for at least 7 days if you live alone or 14 days if you live with others.

I have chronic health conditions. Should I still be riding my bike?

If you ride already, there is no reason to stop riding your bike. Riding indoors on a turbo trainer or exercise bike would be recommended to adhere to government guidelines.

If you have been informed you are ‘at-risk’ and much shield in self-isolation you are restricted from going outdoors.

I am self-isolating but have no symptoms. Should I still be riding my bike?

Yes. Provided you are not in the ‘at risk’ category, have no symptoms and feel fit and well, it is fine to ride your bike once a day.

I have been in contact with others who are self-isolating. Should I still be riding my bike?

Yes, as long as you have no symptoms and feel fit and well, it is fine to ride your bike.

I am still working, and commute to work by bike. Should I still be riding my bike?

Yes, cycling is a great alternative to public transport in terms of minimising the risk of infection. As long as you feel fit and well and have no symptoms, you should continue to ride to work.

I don’t have a bike. Is it too late to buy one?

Absolutely not! We can deliver a bike directly to your home address. Unsure of which bike to go for? Our friendly expert team can help you find the right bike for you, either over the phone or via our video call feature.

What other precautions should I take?

  • Avoid visiting busy areas, and continually bear in mind your distance from others.
  • Wash your hands thoroughly before and after each ride.
  • You should also consider washing your cycling kit, and particularly your gloves if worn. This will minimise the possibility of spreading infection.
  • You should take even more precautions than usual regarding your own personal safety during this time of pressure on the NHS and emergency services.
  • Consider riding the safest possible routes (non-technical, quiet roads, do not go out in difficult weather conditions etc); and adjust your riding style accordingly.
  • As would be normal best-practice, make sure that someone knows your route and how long you expect to be out for.

Updated government guidance can be found here.


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