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7 Tips on Enjoying the Winter Weather

 

Riding a Bike in the Cold

We have pulled together seven top winter tips to help you enjoy riding your Ribble in the depths of the cold season. Afterall there should be no reason not to ride this winter.

1. Ride the Right Bike

It might seem like it goes without saying but don’t ride your best bike through the winter months. Riding a winter-specific bike will not only protect your pride and joy from the wintery road conditions (think salt and water) but it will also keep you comfortable and allow you to set up a winter bike to match the winter conditions.
It might be the North Western weather but Ribble have always been proud of their winter bikes and we have a selection of bikes designed for use throughout the year.

The CGR has mudguard and pannier mounts and disc brakes for a sure-footed winter workhorse.

The Ribble CGR
The CGR is an excellent do it all road bike.

The Ribble CGR

The Winter Audax 7005 is an iconic winter training bike, it’s one of the most recognised bikes on UK winter club runs.

The Ribble 7005 Winter Bike
The Ribble 7005 is an iconic winter bike

The Ribble 7005 Winter Training Bike

The RIBBLE REYNOLDS 525 STEEL offers the best in Reynolds Steel Tubing and frame design for a year-round workhorse.

The Ribble 525
Ribble design and Reynolds tubing.

The Ribble Reynolds 525 Winter Training Bike

 

2. Ride Hard Stay Warm

When the temperature has dropped close to freezing point consider changing up your training plan to a harder ride. One of the by-products of physical exertion is heat, so increasing the intensity of your ride will increase your body temperature and make the ride more bearable. It will reduce the amount of time you can spend on the bike but you will get in a good work out.

A heart rate monitor and cycling computer are a great way to track the level of effort you’re putting into the ride. We have a great range of cycling computers and accessories that can make all the difference when getting your winter training right.

Cycling Computers and Heart Rate Monitors

 

3. Ride the Right Course

One of the girls in the office lives at the top of a hill and her ride always starts with a short but sharp descent “you’re freezing before you have even started” she remarks, but it raises an interesting point – when it’s already cold outside the last thing you should to do is get even colder by rolling down the road not exerting any effort in to a cold, bone-chilling wind, especially after a hot and sweaty 5 minute climb.
Mapping your ride out with a good cycling GPS will help you to plan rides on flat roads. You should also consider riding loops closer to home in case the weather really does turn and you end up needing to end the ride earlier than anticipated.

We offer some great deals on Garmins and the fantastic Xplova device is in stock now!

Garmin cycling computer
Adding a Garmin to your cockpit will help your riding in so many ways.

Cycling Computers

 

4. Dress with Layers

The overall goal of layering is to capture a layer of air (insulation) between each layer of clothing before finalising your fetching ensemble with either a windproof or waterproof layer to regulate your body temperature whilst keeping you dry at the same time.

Base layers are designed to start of this process. A base layer is a layer that sits against the skin, they must trap a small layer of air between your skin and the garment that stays warm but they must also wick away moisture to stop you getting cold and damp.

Ribble bib tights and base layer
A good base layer will make all the difference keeping you warm and dry

Base Layers at Ribble

Mid layers are worn over the top of the base layer, they trap an additional layer of warm air between the base layer and the mid layer and must be breathable. Sometimes a good mid layer like a good soft shell will be your final outer layer.

Ribble have a great range of cycling jackets
Outer layers keep the wind and rain out

Mid Layers at Ribble

Outer layers in cycling are usually waterproof. A good waterproof jacket will be breathable, waterproof and windproof protecting you from the rain and wind keeping you warm and dry.

Outer Layers at Ribble

 

5. Wear Gloves & Overshoes

Cold hands and feet are probably the most frustrating part of being cold, nothing is as bad as feet and hands so cold they hurt but with the right gloves and overshoes, shoes and socks it can be quite easy to overcome.

Gloves As with clothing, warm hands rely on a combination of technical features. A good winter glove must keep the wind out and have a thermal inner to retain the heat. Check out our range of gloves for more inspiration.

Gloves at Ribble

Overshoes – An item of clothing limited to the cycling fraternity the overshoe or over sock is an additional layer of fabric that protects your feet. Put simply, they are a requirement for winter riding.

Over Shoes at Ribble

 

6. Find a Good Coffee Shop… But Keep Warm When You Stop

We can’t help with finding a good coffee shop but on long and lonely winter rides, sometimes the only way to stay upright and #keeppedalling is to stop and get warm with a hot drink and a slice of cake. However, it’s important to stay warm so consider taking an extra base layer in a waterproof bag in your jersey pocket to change in to.

7. Light The Way

Winter is dark. The clocks go back and having lights on the bike to be seen with and to see with is essential.
There is a legal requirement to ride with both a white front light and a red rear light but its just common sense. Ride with lights and have a spare in just in case.

Bike Lights at Ribble

What Do You Think?

Add your winter tips below!

TEAM RIBBLE: Ailbhe and her Aero 883 all set to Tri

Team Ribble sponsored triathlete Ailbhe Carroll looks back on her 2016 and forward to her new tri season which begins on Gran Canaria on March 26th.

My last race of 2016 was in October and finishing racing that late made for a very long season, yet it was my first ever full season without injury or illness. I got to the end of a season absolutely whacked purely because I completed the season from start to finish. It was the first time I have ever felt like a proper triathlete!! Tick that box off!! Yahoo!

Team Ribble tri

I won one of my final races of last season in a new course record and was happy to represent Ribble on top of the podium. It was a non-drafting race and I was ever so proud to have the fastest bike split whilst on my road bike versus everyone else on TT bikes. Shows how awesome my Ribble Aero 883 is… fact!! My bike was my saving grace in 2016. I have documented all my races here on the Ribble blog and there has always been a pattern of my very forgetful limb packing. When I have rocked up to races and forgot to pack my bike legs, my Ribble Aero 883 has still got the job done. This is testament to the high standard of bike that Ribble put on show. Match made in heaven.

Thanks for all the support

All in all 2016 was a great year. I didn’t get half the results I was dreaming of, but 2017 is another opportunity to showcase again and alongside my wonderful supporters I know we will achieve together. Without my trusty bike I would have been lost. Ribble helped me out when I had no bike at all and the difference they have made to me has been extraordinary. A massive thank you to the guys at Ribble for everything they have done for me as it is simply amazing. Polaris Bike wear have been another high up on that list of wows. Protection of bikes doesn’t come cheap and these guys have helped endless amounts. The amount of times I travel abroad knowing my bike is safe is too many to mention. I made over 30 flights in 2016 and my bike has been safe from start to finish. Thank you for your support.  My feet and body have been laughing it up in Newton and Newline kit from the guys at New running gear. All conditions are catered for and I am ever so thankful for what they have done for me. A team like this makes achieving and living your dream a lot easier. Thank you thank you thank you.

str3tch

New Triumph Coaching team

Alongside everything else, I have joined forces with my boyfriend and two other friends and elite international triathletes to form a coaching business called Triumph Coaching. We would love for you guys to have a look at our website and get in touch if you have any questions. We are very keen to hear from you all and would love to know your goals and ambitions for 2017. We are happy to help you in triathlon or just single sports so whatever your needs are we would love to be involved. Just click the link and you can also find us on twitter, facebook and Instagram at team_triumph1

Progress and tri goals

2017 training began in the winter around Loughborough and it was quite ‘fun’ keeping track of how many fingers and toes still had feeling in them! Winter always brings with it a whole pile of laughter!

Run2

I am happy to report massive leaps and jumps forward in my fitness compared to this time last year. I have been able to reduce my working hours which is allowing me to train more and recover… something I didn’t have time for last year! This I know is going to make all the difference in 2017.

I don’t know whether it’s because I have gained a whole year to my life or not but my average heart rate is decreasing by a lot on all my runs. I have always been a high heart rate kind of gal – things are changing! Either I am over the hill or I am actually making use of this consistency in my training and finding fitness! A crazy thought!

My days are structured and planned down to the last millisecond – it’s not for everyone and can be annoying sometimes as you just feel like rest is a mile away all the time – but hey ho, one of life’s musts!

I have some nice goals set out for 2017 and I am very excited to get achieving these bad boys! I am aiming high and striving for more. I know what’s what and as I am my own coach, I know what I do day in and day out and what my stats and figures say I can do. My goals are big for 2017 and I am very excited to get going this weekend in the Gran Canaria European Cup tri (26th March).

I hope that everyone has had a good ol’ crack at winter training! Winter miles for summer smiles and all that jazz!

Happy pedalling everyone!

Ailbhe

TEAM RIBBLE: Share your rides and ride with new friends with the Team Ribble Strava Club

If you’re a ‘Strava addict’ then why not join your fellow Ribble bike owners in the Team Ribble Strava Club? As we go into winter there is no better time to show us your dedication in clocking up the miles and climbing.

You might only be ticking over with weekend riding or knocking out the miles in a daily commute but share it with us and see where other Club members are riding.

Ribble Valley

If you are interested in the leaderboards then we have some serious riders in the Ribble Club putting in over 20 hours of riding a week, long rides over 100 miles and breathtaking amounts of climbing. Look out for our current top dogs – Mark from Blackpool, James Ward from Leeds and cyclocross racer Richard Haughton from Kirkham – who are putting in some serious riding at the moment.

strava-hours

Strava’s global community

Strava, for the third year running, has just published its annual End of Year Insights report for the UK, providing an unparalleled insight into the behaviours and trends of the UK’s cyclists. The tens of millions of members of Strava uploaded an astonishing 9.6 activities every second of every day in 2016, up from 5.3 activities per second in 2015.

The average UK cycle ride on Strava in 2016.
The average UK cycle ride on Strava in 2016.
Here are the other 2016 Cycling Highlights:

– Globally, cyclists shared a total of 161 million rides in 2016; 27.4 million of those in the UK.

– 223,376 rides were recorded as commutes each week in the UK.

– Male cyclists recorded an average 41 km per ride, while female cyclists averaged 34 km per ride.

A further measure of Strava’s social community is the kudos, where members give praise to another’s activity. Strava saw 1.3 billion kudos given worldwide, with 183 million kudos within the UK. An impressive 51 million photos were also shared worldwide, with 5.4 million images shared in the UK alone.

How the UK compares on Strava

In terms of cycling countries, the UK only lags behind the much (averagely) flatter Netherlands for average cycling speeds. The cycling mad Netherlands leads with a 26.92 kph average for male cyclist with the UK just behind with 25.61 kph.

We look forward to seeing you in the Team Ribble Strava Club.

strava

GUIDE: Britain’s best velodromes – where to ride track in the UK

Ride at the UK’s top cycling centres

British cycle racing hasn’t always been the huge success story that it is today and, like many great sporting feats, the results of London 2012 and the Rio 2016 Olympics came after years of preparation, dedication and investment.

Britain’s velodromes naturally have played their part in this success – both past and present – and their place within cycling’s rich folklore should never be downplayed.

But where and when did the first velodromes spring up? Are they still used today? And if so, are they the places where Britain’s gold medalists honed their craft?

ribble-eliminator-2017-bike

The early velodromes

One of the world’s first velodromes was built at Preston Park in Brighton, a 633 yard long track that opened in 1877. Portsmouth velodrome soon followed, featuring a single straight joined by one swooping curve.

The materials that were used in the early velodromes differed from track to track, as did each circuit’s functionality. While some were built specifically for cycling, others were built around the outside of running tracks, providing extra lanes for runners to train.

Throughout the history of the Olympics, many velodromes were used – all of which differed in size, length and technical aspects. In fact, it wasn’t until the 1990s when the length of velodromes were standardised, a factor which resulted in the reason why today’s events take place on a 250 metre track, as opposed to the various lengths that were used throughout the 20th century.

ribble-eliminator-2017-a

UK’s greatest tracks

Although some of the early velodromes may have closed their doors, there are still many great velodromes here in the UK and the number of facilities continues to increase. Just take a look at some of the tracks below.

Lee Valley VeloPark – now arguably the most famous velodrome in the UK the Lee Valley VeloPark, in east London, is the track where Sir Chris Hoy, Victoria Pendleton and Laura Trott rode to victory during the London 2012 Olympic Games.

Manchester Velodrome – the home of British Cycling (the sport’s governing body), Manchester Velodrome is the place where some of the nation’s finest Olympians have trained over the years. Located near the Etihad Stadium, the velodrome is also open to the public  – just make sure you book well in advance if ever you fancy a few laps!

ribble-eliminator-2017-b

The Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome – while the Manchester Velodrome may be home to British Cycling, the Scottish Cycling team can often be found training on Glasgow’s Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome. Again, this track is open to the public, which is handy for any cyclist looking to build their fitness.

Herne Hill Velodrome – is one of the oldest tracks in the world, built in south London in 1891, and for decades was the home of the famous Good Friday Track Meeting. In 1948 it hosted the track cycling events at the London Olympics and it is still a very popular track for training and racing today.

Newport Velodrome – The Welsh National Velodrome opened in 2003 and was used by the British track cycling team for its pre-event training camps ahead of the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Summer Olympics. It has also been crucial in developing a string of talented Welsh cyclists such as Nicole Cooke and Geraint Thomas.

ribble-eliminator-2017-c

Remembering Leicester track

While the tracks above highlight some of the best UK velodromes today, it’s worth remembering one of of the great velodromes of the past.

The Saffron Lane Velodrome – an outdoor stadium that once played host to some of British Cycling’s most memorable moments – was a 3,100 seater velodrome located in Leicester. The Leicester track hosted the UCI World Championships in 1970 and 1982.

Unfortunately, the opening of the new Manchester Velodrome hastened the end for the once glorious Saffron Lane track which eventually closed its doors in 1999.

Take a look at the map below to see where all the UK’s velodromes are located and to find out more about which notable cyclists have trained where.

Ribble launched the new, exciting full carbon Eliminator track bike during the 2016-17 track season. Read all about it here.

 

Name Location
1 Caird Park Dundee
2 Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome Glasgow
3 Meadowbank Velodrome Edinburgh
4 Tommy Givan Track Orangefield, Belfast
5 Middlesbrough Sports Village Middlesbrough
6 Richmondshire Velodrome (Richmondshire Cricket Club Velodrome) Richmond, North Yorkshire
7 York Sport Velodrome York, North Yorkshire
8 Roundhay Park Leeds, West Yorkshire
9 Quibell Park Stadium Scunthorpe
10 Long View Leisure (Knowsley Leisure & Culture Park) Huyton Knowsley, Merseyside
11 Manchester Velodrome (The National Cycling Centre) Manchester
12 Forest Town Welfare Mansfield,Nottinghamshire
13 Lyme Valley Stadium Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire
14 Derby Arena Derby
15 Aldersley Track Aldersley,Wolverhampton
16 Halesowen Velodrome Halesowen, West Midlands
17 Carmarthen Park Carmarthen
18 Maindy Stadium (Maindy Centre) Cardiff
19 Newport Velodrome (Newport Velo) Newport
20 Palmer Park Stadium Reading
21 Gosling Sports Park Welwyn Garden City
22 Lee Valley VeloPark Leyton, East London
23 Herne Hill Velodrome London
24 Poole Park Track Poole, Dorset
25 Bournemouth Cycle Centre Bournemouth,Dorset
26 Calshot Velodrome Calshot
27 The Mountbatten Centre Portsmouth
28 Preston Park Brighton, East Sussex