Team Ribble: Tri victory and top 10 performances for our Ribble racers

Three members of the Ribble Cycles staff were in racing action last weekend – and there was one gold winning victory. Here’s how they got on…

In triathlon…

Dionne Allen from Ribble’s Customer Service team won the Monster Middle Triathlon in Ely, Cambridgeshire on Sunday and finished tenth overall in a field of 170 finishers.

She contested the longest event on the day which was over a 1.9km swim, 92.8km bike leg and a 21km run.

Team Ribble
Dionne speeds past Ely Cathedral on her way to victory. Photo: Ian Green Photography

On her Ribble Aero TT bike, Dee rode the near 100km bike leg in 2 hours 47 minutes and recorded an overall finishing time of 4 hours 43 minutes 47 seconds.

The impressive victory sets Dee up for a good race in the gruelling Helvellyn Triathlon in September which is considered to be one of the toughest races in the world. The open water swim is in Ullswater, the tough cycle leg includes Kirkstone Pass and the run is to the summit of Helvellyn and back down!

In road racing…

Graham Payne finished seventh in TLI Cycling National Road Race Championships, held last weekend at Audlem in North Staffordshire.

Graham described it as a frustrating race but has to be pleased with a top ten finish at championship level.

Team Ribble Graham

“It was stop, start, stop, start, all day long,” said Graham, “Breaks kept going away, being caught and then there was another long lull. The winning break went towards the end of the race and after missing it I was sprinting for the minor places.”

Over 200 riders competed across a number of age categories and they were the largest fields ever assembled for a TLI National Championships with spectators enjoying a great day of racing.

In time trialling…

Matt Stell was the unluckiest or luckiest Ribble rider of the weekend when he was in a spill with a vehicle during the Association’s 12-hour Time Trial.

Team Ribble Matt Stell
Matt Stell in action. Photo: Ellen Isherwood/Lancs Racing Scene

A car accidentally blocked Matt’s riding line and he could not avoid colliding with it and causing damage to his front wheel. Despite the crash Matt still finished the WCTTCA & LTTCA event and even beat his 12-hour personal best by six miles to cover an amazing 264.81 miles! Matt’s distance over the 12-hour event put him in sixth place.

Matt’s great form continues – earlier in the month he recorded a fast 20 minute 34 sec time trial over the 10 mile Levens course in Cumbria.

Review: “Some bikes just feel good? The 525 is like that.” The Guardian

Cycling journalist and The Guardian’s North of England editor Helen Pidd raved about the Ribble 525 steel bike in last Saturday’s weekend edition of the national newspaper

The Ribble 525 is our versatile steel bike that is designed for a multitude of practical uses. Our love affair with steel frames has been going on for decades, but that’s not to say we haven’t moved on – far from it. Today, our steel 525 road bike is built for the modern era, meaning you can expect plenty of comfort and durability as well style. Prices for a fully built 525 start at £695.95.

Journalist Helen Pidd even tested the 525 during a rainy weekend in the Peak District and her review was published in Saturday’s edition of The Guardian newspaper.

Pidd is the author of “Love your bike: the Complete Guide to Everyday Cycling” and a well-respected writer on all things cycling.

Ribble 525 reviewed

She gave the bike a proper testing riding with a friend who is predominantly a mountain biker which she says in the review “meant a few ill-advised ‘shall we just see where this one goes?’ diversions. One, past the Derbyshire village of Wash, involved pedalling up a gravelly stream and almost an early bath.”

It soaked up the worst bumps

The 525 performed perfectly though and according to Helen, “The 25mm tyres rolled along fine, even on rocky terrain. The skinny steel frame (Reynolds 525) soaked up the worst of the bumps”

You can build your own Ribble 525 (from £695.95) using our easy-to-use BikeBuilder here.

We’re including more of Helen’s review below but for the full article visit The Guardian here.

“You know how some bikes just feel good? You get on, set off, and think: Oh, we are going to be together a long time. Like when you meet someone new and fit perfectly into their embrace on the first go without any need for adjustments. It was like that for the Ribble and me.”

3

 

“It looks a delight… It’s the perfect little winter bike, or a very snazzy commuter. I can really see a future for the pair of us together.”

Tested: Ribble 525 in numbers

Ribble Reynolds handlebars

Frame (£659.95) Ribble 525 STEEL Winter/Audax
Groupset (+ £139.99) Campagnolo Veloce Silver 10 Speed Double
Seatpost (+ £18.99) CSN Carbon S.E. Seatpillar
Saddle (+ £5.99) Selle Italia Lady Flow Saddle
Guardian rating 9/10

Full review here: Cycling | The Guardian

Guardian 525 review

Review: Secret Race Informed Essentials for your kit bag

‘STRIP’ are training and race care hygiene and performance products and the brainchild of Tim Lawson who has had over 20 years of experience developing sports products with athletes’ needs at the heart. SECRET – RACE – INFORMED – PRODUCTS or ‘STRIP’ are clearly the kind of ‘secret’ training/racing essentials to have in your kit bag.

Continue reading Review: Secret Race Informed Essentials for your kit bag

Team Ribble: Ailbhe inspired by Rio Games and happy after Euro Cup + Video

Team Ribble-sponsored triathlete Ailbhe Carroll is excited by the Rio Olympics after a good performance in the Malmo European Cup triathlon. Watch her video below…

The Olympics… Where little kids dream of going and where big kids have dreams come true. What a fabulous representation of how sport can bring people together. Anyone following Rio will have come across the picture which was a selfie of the young North and South Korean gymnasts together… how fabulous to see. Another picture which went viral was the beach volleyball picture which included team Egypt playing in full length kit. Brilliant. So many cultural differences put aside for the love of a sport. Brilliant.

Malmo Triathlon

The Olympics, and sport in general of course, have been tainted with doping scandals. It’s horrible to see so many clean athletes being affected by so many doping athletes and nations. It makes you question why they do it. It makes you question if anyone is actually clean. It makes you look at your own rivals and think… are you clean?

My latest European Cup triathlon

I raced in Sweden a week ago and had the most fabulous race experience to date. I travelled with my boyfriend Rich who wasn’t racing, but was there to help me and this proved very beneficial. He was able to do small things like carry my bike box and do some errands which allowed me to rest and conserve my energies.

I also had the pleasure of meeting one of my countrywomen, and now true friends, whilst out there. I somehow dodged meeting Susanna Murphy on many race occasions but when I met her randomly on a cobbled street in Malmo, I knew she was a keeper! What an awesome girl! Susanna went on to finish 14th in Malmo to gain her 3rd top 15 in a row on the international scene – flying that Irish tricolour flag loud and clear. When I grow up I want to be like her!

Ribble inTransition

I went in to the Malmo triathlon ranked number 29 and my realistic goal for this race was a top 25 finish. Unfortunately I didn’t get that and finished 29th but there were so many positives to take from this race. The first major positive was how relaxed and controlled I was before the race start. I have serious issues with eating breakfast on travel day to races and race day morning.

For some reason although my nerves feel fine, my stomach does not allow me to eat and I feel incredibly nauseous before racing. This time round I was able to eat half a bowl of cereal and some white bread with a bit of bacon. I was having weird cravings, but was going to eat whatever I could get down me as something was better than the usual nothing. Big success.

Another success surrounded the build up to the race. I was so calm and collected being around Susanna. Having Rich there as a familiar someone was hugely calming. Race day, although it brought with it some surprises in weather conditions and whether we were allowed wetsuits or not, it went rather smoothly. The water temperature was all over the place. The day before the race it was 18.8 degrees (wetsuit). The morning of the race 17.6 (wetsuit) and then one hour before the race – 20.8 (none wetsuit). Whatever that water was doing I was not a fan! A few issues upon check-in and we were ready to rock.

My Ribble gets me back in touch

During the race itself – I swam main pack which is where I expected to be. But I was at the back of the pack and a trip and meet and greet with the ground upon swim exit meant I was on the back foot. I went from being there to wow – where did she go?! I did all I could and my Ribble Aero 883 which got me back in touch with the group.

Ribble Aero 883 Malmo Triathlon

However at this point the main pack on the swim had split into two and the group I had caught back on to was the second half of that group. Not ideal. The eventual winner who then travelled to Rio for the Olympic triathlon, came from my swim pack so that’s very encouraging in itself. I felt incredibly strong on the bike and my little Ribble rocket was fabulous. Entering T2 I was actually running for a top 20 finish despite the previous events and trips. The top 20 wasn’t there for me this race but it’s all there for the taking once I get myself to stop tripping up over my own feet. The ingredients are there, I just need to get mixing and then baking!

Sweden was a special race for me as one of the main sponsors was one of my own sponsors… Newline sport. They are the sponsor of both Swedish and Danish triathlon and so it was nice to see their flag flying high… helped along by the extreme winds as well! The role a sponsor plays in the journey of an athlete is rather huge. I would like to take this time to reinforce how important sponsors are.

Sponsors are so important

No journey is smooth and no journey is cheap. Support, both financially and in equipment, is just massive and allows athletes to grow. Where does the role of sponsor fit in for athletes who don’t start their journey on the podium? It fits in everywhere. There are athletes who started nowhere and are now the best in their field. Their sponsors stood by them when things were looking a little grim. Losing sponsors at a time where races don’t go smoothly is a kick in the teeth athletes don’t need.

We all want to promote the brands as best we can and do our sponsors proud in an effort to thank them but this doesn’t always happen. Sponsors who are there through thick and thin, through the lows and the highs, for the love of trying to help and support – they are the ones who make the difference. Such a huge support. I have been so lucky in having such great support this year.

Malmo Triathlon

I have not had the success just yet that I have been dreaming of but each day is a day building strength and speed I didn’t have the day before and each triathlon shows progress. Having people believe in you is a big boost and I believe I will have the success I dream of one day. Rome wasn’t built in a day and some journeys require more time than others. I have time and I am very motivated to get myself to where I want to be.

 

Thank you as ever to Ribble Cycles, Polaris Bikewear, Newton running, Newline sport and New Running Gear. I’m sorry the podium hasn’t come yet but it will!

I hope everyone is cycling happy and loving doing what they are doing – triathlon or cycling!

Stay safe, stay healthy,
Ailbhe 🙂

Malmo Triathlon

Guide: Going for Gold at the ‘Big Event’ – our guide to the cycling events

We hope you’re as excited as we are as a feast of cycling at the Rio Olympics approaches. Eighteen cycling gold medals will be keenly fought for and it all starts this weekend. Four years ago, at the London Olympics, Great Britain headed the medals table with a fantastic haul of eight gold, two silver and two bronze. Who will you be rooting for in Rio?

The opening ceremony takes place late (23.15) on Friday evening and cycling is one of the major sports that will dominate the first week of Games action with the men’s road race kicking things off on Saturday (6th August).

MG - BOCAIUVA - 10/05/2016 - REVEZAMENTO DA TOCHA RIO 2016 - Revezamento da Tocha Olimpica para os Jogos Rio 2016. Foto: Rio2016/Fernando Soutello
Photo: Rio2016/Fernando Soutello
No late nights?

Cycling fans are lucky that practically all the racing will take place at convenient times for UK viewers (all times stated here are British Summer Time). The road races, time trials, triathlon and mountain biking will all take place during the afternoon and the six days of track cycling sessions will run largely from 14.00 to 22.30.

The time difference between the UK and Brazil will mean that some of the biggest (evening) events from other sports will happen in the very early hours of the morning and the BBC’s Breakfast Show will become an Olympics highlights show so we can catch up with events.

Road Races

The Olympic road races will be contested by national teams of up to five riders each over a tough and lumpy circuit that should favour hilly Classics riders. Spain’s Alejandro Valverde and Italian Vincenzo Nibali are being mentioned as favourites, but the road race can throw up a surprise winner.

Britain take a strong five-man road team to the Olympics but no recognised sprinter. The final climb is thought to be too far from the finish line to favour Chris Froome or Adam Yates so Team GB will perhaps be hoping to get Steve Cummings, Ian Stannard or Geraint Thomas into a small breakaway group that could contest the medals.

In the women’s race World champion Lizzie Armitstead will be up against a strong Dutch team again as she hopes to upgrade the silver medal she won in London four years ago behind Marianne Vos.

Television commentator Anthony McCrossan was driven around the road race course this week and said, “It’s going to be an incredible race. The course is very hard with stunning scenery.”

UCI President Brian Cookson is also excited about Rio and told the press, “The road race mixes some of Rio’s most iconic backdrops such as Copacabana and Ipanema with some really testing sections such as the Grumari Circuit. The steep climb up Grumari Road is sure to provide a unique test for time trial riders.”

The men’s road race, over 237.5km, starts at 13.30 (finishing approx. 19.51) on Saturday (6th August) followed by the 136.9km women’s road race at 16.15 (finishing approx. 20.23) on Sunday.

GB Men’s team: Chris Froome; Steve Cummings; Ian Stannard; Geraint Thomas; and Adam Yates. GB Women’s team: Lizzie Armitstead; Nikki Harris; and Emma Pooley.

Check out Ribble Road bikes here
Best Of British - South Pennines-8

Time Trial

Team Great Britain is likely to select Chris Froome to compete in the time trial where he stands an excellent chance of following in the wheel tracks of Sir Bradley Wiggins and winning the gold medal. The GB selections for the time trial  will be made after the road race events. Update: Team GB time trial selections are: Chris Froome, Geraint Thomas and Emma Pooley.

Both time trials place on Wednesday 10th August with the women riders starting first from 12.30 (racing over 29.86km) and the men riders heading out from 14.00. The men’s 54.56km two-lap course includes four significant climbs which will suit Tour de France winner Froome.

Check out Ribble Time Trial Bikes

Track Cycling

The large track programme starts on Thursday 11th August and the Men’s Team Sprint will be the first final. The Men’s Team Pursuit featuring Sir Bradley Wiggins will also begin on the opening day at 17.23 and the British quartet of Wiggins, Steven Burke, Ed Clancy and Owain Doull will be hoping to qualify for the final taking place at 18.20 on Friday 12th August. The track events continue until Tuesday 16th August.

Get into Track Cycling with the Ribble Pista

Triathlon

The men’s triathlon is contested on Thursday 18th August with the women’s race on Saturday 20th August both starting at 11.00. Alistair Brownlee defends his Olympic title and heads a six-strong Team GB triathlon squad.

GB Men’s triathlon: Alistair Brownlee, Jonny Brownlee and Gordon Benson. GB Women’s triathlon: Non Stanford, Vicky Holland and Helen Jenkins.

Check out the range of Ribble Triathlon Bikes

Ribble Aero TT: our time trial and triathlon missile.
Mountain Biking

The cycling events at the Rio Olympics will conclude with the two mountain bike races, around a five kilometre lap, on the final weekend of competition. World road race champion Peter Sagan returns to off-road racing, but it would be a big surprise if he can beat the MTB specialists.

The women will race on Saturday 20th August and the men 24 hours later. Both races start at 16.30 and Grant Ferguson is the only British rider selected.  

Check out Ribble Mountain Bikes here

Olympic Cycling Timetable

Sat 6 Aug: Men’s Road Race.
Sun 7 Aug: Women’s Road Race.
Wed 10 Aug: Road Time Trials.
Thu 11 to Tue 16 Aug: Track events.
Thu 18 & Sat 20 Aug: Triathlon
Sat 20 & Sun 21 Aug: Mountain Biking.

The Paralympic Games follow on in Rio and run from 7-18th September.

ES - LINHARES - 18/05/2016 - REVEZAMENTO DA TOCHA RIO 2016 - Revezamento da Tocha Olimpica para os Jogos Rio 2016. Foto: Rio2016/Andre Luiz Mello
Photo: Rio2016/Andre Luiz Mello